Gore piles, smoke and morale explained..

Gore piles, smoke and morale explained..

Gore Piles:

CREATED BY: a heavy cannon (artillery) hit that does 4 or more damage. Heavy cannon hits ALWAYS cause a morale hit AND a gore pile.  Note that siege cannons do 4 upon specified target (without a lock) and mortars do 4 damage to everything in a 7 hex area.  A normal cannon usually needs the target unit to be locked before this will happen.

UNITS AFFECTED BY BEING ON A GORE PILE: low confident units (units with no yellow stars)

THE EFFECT
– unit takes +1 damage from all attacks.
– all further cannon (artillery) shots cause a morale hit. (even weak shots)

THE TACTICAL SOLUTION:
– decide if it’s worth it to stay or break away. Usually you will break away.

THICK SMOKE:
CREATED BY: 2 layers of normal smoke.
DURRATION: 1-2 rounds
MOVEMENT 1 hex per round, you can see what direction it will move in the following round. But you can’t be certain if it will fade out or not.

The smoke view can be controlled with the smoke-puff button.  This toggles natural smoke view (showing all the little wisps) or just the thick smoke view (showing only hexes with overlapping smoke that blocks line of sight.)  Natural looks better, but thick view is more practical tactically.  Sometimes though you want to see where the wisp’s of thin smoke are so that you can add a musket shot over top of it to deliberately create thick smoke for defensive (or offensive) purposes.

TACTICAL USES:
– Cavalry LOVE smoke to sneak up on units in hard core mode where the smoke makes them invisible.
– A defensive cannon shield. Where should you move? Look at the smoke, look at the wind direction, look at the shooters (mostly cannons) and move to where the smoke will be next round (if it doesn’t fade away) This gives you a ‘chance’ at some cover.
– Don’t have your cannons too close together. They will smoke block their own shots quicker and you don’t want a cavalry unit to take them both out at once with a single charge.
– A bunch of slow moving muskets on an open field facing lots of cannons only have his one thing to help them. When the forward cannon defenders come out to lock or get close the muskets can form a temporary defensive wall that allows the rest of the army to close in safely for a round or two. Without ‘thick blocking smoke’ cannons on an open field would be too powerful and nobody would want to engage. Smoke adds the right amount of balance for a fun and realistic fight.

MORALE:
– Normal units can take 2 morale hits then they are gone (routed).
– Boosted units with extra confidence (yellow stars) can take extra morale hits. Each star is like an extra morale hit point.
– Each star also allows that unit an extra point of melee damage.

Morale Hits are what reduce your morale: 4 things cause morale hits.
1) Cavalry charges **
2) Rear flank melee attacks. (all 3 rear positions) **
3) Heavy cannon hits (4 or more points of damage)
4) Any Cannon hit (upon low confident units upon a gore pile)

** (the attacker must be same size or larger than target)

TACTICAL INFO:
Morale-hits are rewards to players for good play. Force your enemy to lock and expose their rear sides. Charge them or blast them with cannons when the time is right.

But they are also a good way for the weaker player to make a comeback. With some good moves large amounts of men can be removed from the battle field.

Good defensive play can reduce how many morale hits you take, and good offensive play can increase how many morale hits you cause. In general you want to cause more than you get to win. A great leader tries to keep his men from fleeing while causing as much terror to the enemy as possible. Unit morale states are more important that casualty losses in these types of battles.

The great leader doesn’t just manoeuvre with unit sizes in mind. He watches the smoke and wind directions and is aware of uneasy and panicked units on both sides. Then he makes his moves with all things considered.

iTunes Link: https://itunes.apple.com/app/id436684234

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